The Ice Bowl Disc Golf Tournament is Now Open

Registration Page HERE

This will be a 2 round charity tournament on January 21st at Bellamy Park in Dover, NH.

Tournament will start at 9 am so be there by 8:30 at the latest.

Registration fees:

Pro $45

Pro Masters $45

Pro Women $45

Amateur Men $30

Amateur Women $30

Intermediate Men $30

Recreational Men $25

All Players will receive a custom Ice Bowl disc. We have a great selection this year.

Supercolor Buzzz *full color ice bowl stamp*

Cryztal Z Buzzz

Star Destroyer

Luster Teebird3

XT Nova

4S Wizard

Lucid Emac Truth

This years tournament will benefit the Dover Food Pantry. Please bring 2 non-perishable food items with you to the tournament. Our goal is 100 pounds of food to donate.

We will also be raffling off a Grip bag and all proceeds will also go to the food pantry. Tickets will be available for purchase at Walters.

The Ice Bowl is always a great time and a great charity so lets show eveyone what the disc golf community can do and sell this thing out!!

https://goo.gl/Es1HzW

disc golfing in nh

Disc Golf Discs – What you need to know

Disc Golf Discs – What you need to know

3 Basic Disc types

The golf discs used today are much smaller and heavier than traditional flying discs, typically 8– 9 inches (20– 23 cm) in diameter and weighing between 120 and 180 grams. The PDGA prohibits discs heavier than 200 grams. Discs used for disc golf are designed and shaped for control, speed, and accuracy, while general-purpose flying discs, such as those used for playing guts or ultimate, have a more traditional shape, similar to a catch disc. There is a wide variety of discs used in disc golf and they are generally divided into three categories: putters, all-purpose mid-range discs, and drivers.

Putter

Putters are similar to the discs used in simple games of catch, such as the Wham-o brand Frisbee. They are designed to fly straight, predictably, and very slowly compared to mid-range discs and drivers.

Mid-range

Mid-range discs have slightly sharper edges that enable them to cut through the air better. Some players will use mid-ranges as drivers, and there are tournaments that require players to use only mid-range discs.

Driver

Drivers are usually recognized by their sharp, beveled edge and have most of their mass concentrated on the outer rim of the disc rather than distributed equally throughout. They are designed to travel farther distances at greater speeds and are mostly used for tee-off and other long distance throws. Drivers are often divided into different categories. Innova Discs divides their discs into Distance Drivers and Fairway Drivers, with a fairway driver being somewhere between a distance driver and a mid-range disc. Discraft divides their drivers into 3 categories: Long Drivers, Extra Long Drivers, and Maximum Distance Drivers. Because the physics of a disc require “snap” or “flick”, which means putting spin on the disc, new players generally find that throwing a distance driver accurately can be somewhat difficult and will require experience with golf disc response. This is why it is better for players to begin with fairway drivers, long drivers, or even mid-ranges, and incorporate maximum distance drivers as their strength and disc control increases. Most players that are starting off will be most likely throwing lighter discs. Another type of driver, used less frequently, is a roller. As the name indicates, it has an edge designed to roll rather than fly.

Stability

Stability is the measurement of a disc’s tendency to bank laterally during its flight. A disc that is over-stable will tend to track left (for a right handed, backhand throw), whereas a disc that is under-stable will tend to track right (also for a right handed, backhand throw). The stability rating of the discs differs depending on the manufacturer of the disc. Innova Discs rate stability as “turn” and “fade”. “Turn” references how the disc will fly at high speed during the beginning and middle of its flight, and is rated on a scale of +1 to − 5, where +1 is the most overstable and − 5 is the most understable. “Fade” references how the disc will fly at lower speeds towards the end of its flight, and is rated on a scale of 0 to 5, where 0 has the least fade, and 5 has the most fade. A disc with a turn of − 5 and fade of +1 will fly to the right for (right handed, backhand throw) the majority of its flight then curl back minimally left at the end. A disc with a turn of − 1 and a fade of +3 will turn slightly right during the middle of its flight and turn hard left as it slows down.

These ratings can be found on the discs themselves or from the manufacturer’s web site. Discraft prints the stability rating on all discs and also provides this information on their web site. The stability ranges from 3 to − 2 for Discraft discs; however Discraft’s ratings are more of a combination of turn and fade with the predominance being fade.

In the same way, a flying disc resists rolling (flipping over) because spin adds gyroscopic stability. A flying disc will maintain its spin rate even as it loses velocity. Toward the end of a disc’s flight, when the spin and velocity lines cross, a flying disc will predictably begin to fade.

Plastics

There are a variety of different discs, each with a specific plastic made with them. Plastics such as DX, J-Pro, Pro-D, X-Line and R-Pro from Innova discs and Discraft are some of the less durable plastics, but good for beginners due to their lower prices, compared to the higher end plastics. Plastics such as Champion, Titanium, FLX, GStar, and Star plastics, which are the best offered from the same companies, offering the best flight, quality and durability compared to the other types available

The golf discs used today are much smaller and heavier than traditional flying discs, typically 8– 9 inches (20– 23 cm) in diameter and weighing between 120 and 180 grams. Discs used for disc golf are designed and shaped for accuracy, speed, and control, while general-purpose flying discs, such as those used for playing guts or ultimate, have a more traditional shape, similar to a catch disc. There is a wide variety of discs used in disc golf and they are generally divided into three categories: putters, all-purpose mid-range discs, and drivers.

Innova Discs divides their discs into Distance Drivers and Fairway Drivers, with a fairway driver being somewhere between a distance driver and a mid-range disc. Because the physics of a disc require “snap” or “flick”, which means putting spin on the disc, new players generally find that throwing a distance driver accurately can be somewhat difficult and will require experience with golf disc response.

nh disc golf